Much of what we have seen in cricket mirrors the broadening and deepening engagement between India and Australia on the global stage.

Of the exactly 100 test matches played between the two countries since India’s independence in 1947 to the end of 2020, 50% have been played since 1995 alone.

Correspondingly, two way merchandise trade between the two nations, according to UNCTAD data, has grown from $1208.5 US million in 1995 to $13066.3 US million in 2018.

Growing investment, cultural and diplomatic ties between the two countries, has ensured that there will be healthy competition between two major world economies, as there has been with the two major cricketing powers.

In a big boost for the war against COVID-19, Britain on Wednesday authorized emergency use of the Oxford-AstraZenecca vaccine, making it the first country to approve the vaccine that is expected to be the mainstay of India’s inoculation programme early in 2021.

While deemed less effective than the Pfizer vaccine, it easy storage and transport requirements make it the apt choice for middle and lower income countries such as India.

India being the largest producer of vaccines in the world. The Serum Institute of India (SII) has already produced nearly 50 million doses of Covishield — the vaccine’s local name in India. It is now awaiting emergency use approval from the Indian regulator, which could come very soon now that the UK has given the green light.

No better way to bring in 2021, one would say.

We wish you a Happy and Safe New Year!

Flights to and from the UK have been banned till December 31 over a new fast-spreading strain of the corona-virus across Europe, the government said today as several countries announced similar moves earlier.

A joint monitoring group on COVID-19 had met this morning to discuss the mutant corona-virus that is spreading rapidly in the UK..

Canada, Saudi Arabia, and several European countries have suspended flights from the UK over the new strain, believed to be 70 per cent more infectious.

Much is unknown about the strain, but experts say current vaccines should still be effective against it.

The health ministry earlier said the government was fully alert about the new strain and stressed “there’s no need to panic”.

The ban will come into effect on Wednesday and all passengers arriving from the UK before then will be tested on arrival at airports.

Bitcoin surpassed $20,000 for the first time, The world’s most well-known cryptocurrency surged into its highest-ever valuation, amid increased institutional and corporate interest, as well as concerns.

Bitcoin has seen a meteoric climb since March, when few fintech majors announced would enable the use of the cryptocurrency as legitimate tender. The value of Bitcoin stood at around $5,000 in March, which means it has increased 400 percent in the last eight months.

That’s right, 400 percent.

Unregulated by any central bank, Bitcoin has therefore raised valid concerns about the impact decentralized finance will have on the global financial…

The giddy reception to the Airbnb IPO was exciting to watch, but it has downsides that go beyond leaving money on the table.

The home-rental platform’s stock price peaked at $165 during its trading debut at a premium of 143 percent.

The elevated price levels after the first day of trading will likely mean more volatility going forward, which could distract management and employees from doing their jobs. Also, it becomes more difficult to hire new talent as stock-option grants are set at frothy levels.

When one considers that Airbnb recorded more than $1 billion in losses over the…

We are entering the age of the conscious consumer, in a world where Greta Thunberg holds court.

Consumers are increasingly demanding that corporations address the significant issues of our times, and companies who do get a big reputation bump among customers.

There is no doubt that no matter how much purpose executives inject into their organizations, profit-seeking will remain the primary driver of C-suite decision making.

Yet there are now plenty of financial and ethical reasons for leaders to strike a balance between profit and purpose.

Is the road to altruistic enterprise a return to businesses’ DNA, to what they should never have ceased to be, a means to build prosperous and harmonious societies?

Through choice or by necessity, some of us are becoming self-employed for the first time during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Evidence globally suggests that self-employed workers are one of the groups hardest hit by the pandemic. Support offered by governments varies across countries.

Yet, for some, self-employment may represent the only way of earning a living and remaining active in the labour market.

The self-employed are a diverse group that includes everyone from independent consultants, hairdressers and dog walkers, to executive producers and part-time delivery drivers.

What can those transitioning to self-employment do to protect their well-being?

Justin Trudeau expressed concern about the Indian security forces’ attitude toward protesting farmers in India, claiming his government has always been a supporter of peaceful protests.

With this, he becomes the first international leader to comment on the situation unfolding in Delhi, where thousands of farmers are on the road against the new agriculture law of the Indian government.

The Indian Foreign Ministry raised a strong objection to Trudeau’s statement. The Foreign Ministry maintained that Trudeau’s statement was ‘half-baked’ and beyond the truth, and amounting to interfering in the internal affairs of a democratic country.

In early 2018, Trudeau had visited India on a seven-day tour, but the visit was ‘lukewarm’ at best and anonymous at worst, as no special attention was given to the visit by the Indian government or mainstream media.

It is predicted that global foreign direct investment (FDI) activity may fall by 40% due to the economic crisis caused by the pandemic.

While that figure gives pause for thought and is clearly a bad knock for the global economy, it also reveals that there is still a lot of interest worldwide in pursuing the right FDI opportunities, and that investment activity, while reduced, will continue.

Brazil is taking several proactive measures to aid the economic recovery by incentivizing both investors and small businesses. Are there any lessons for the Indian economy, where the results of the ‘Make in India’ campaign have been sobering at best?

Can Rio teach Mumbai?

President of the European Central Bank, Christine Lagarde, recently spoke at a virtual summit, where she observed, ‘We were standing on one side of a massive river of uncertainty and hardship… thanks to the tremendous hard work of companies in the US, Germany and other corners of the world we’re now seeing the other side of the river’

But are we safely on out way to the other side of the choppy waters?

She also warned that a generation of young job-seekers risked having their “dreams crushed” without a rebound in jobs growth in the private sector.

Nowhere is this more pertinent than in the youngest country in the world.

A mix of technological innovation, responsible business and friendly policies for small businesses would be the recipe to avoid another ‘lost generation’ of employable talent.

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